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Stop the New England tar sands pipeline
Sign the petition by Monday to demand that the Canadian National Energy Board fully review the safety threats of a tar sands oil pipeline through New England.

Sign the petition to stop the New England tar sands oil pipeline.

Dear Friend,

As we continue fighting TransCanada’s plan to funnel highly toxic tar sands oil across the U.S. heartland to Texas through the Keystone XL pipeline, oil companies are trying new gimmicks to get tar sands to U.S. ports for export.

Take Enbridge. This Canadian oil giant -- responsible for a massive tar sands oil spill into the Kalamazoo River in Michigan not yet two years ago -- now wants to pipe tar sands oil through New England.

Worse yet, Enbridge is trying to evade a thorough cross-border review process -- to break its plan into phases and get out of telling the public what will happen to drinking water not if, but when there is a spill.

As Canadian regulators begin to consider Enbridge's plan, it's crucial that people on both sides of the border speak out. Sign the petition today to the Canadian National Energy Board to demand a thorough review of the pipeline’s likely impacts on New England’s water and communities.

Enbridge's plan -- called the Trailbreaker project -- is to reverse the flow of two existing pipelines to get tar sands oil from Canada through New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine, where the oil would leave U.S. shores on super tankers.

The Trailbreaker pipeline would threaten our climate by helping to further ignite the continent's biggest carbon bomb in the tar sands -- tar sands oil production generates three times more global warming pollution than conventional oil production.

The pipeline would also endanger a number of drinking water sources, rivers and wild lands of New England. Tar sands pipelines are more susceptible to spills than other pipelines and a spill of this type of dirty, heavy and corrosive oil is more devastating to local communities and takes longer to clean up. More than a year after another Enbridge pipeline spilled a million gallons of tar sands oil into the Kalamazoo River, small businesses are hurting, property values are down, and miles of river remain closed.

Tar sands pipelines make climate change worse and are built to spill. Add your name to our petition demanding a full review of the safety risks, and we’ll deliver it to the Canadian National Energy Board before the public comment period closes this Monday.

Enbridge is in the beginning stages of seeking approval for its tar sands scheme, and we’ll watchdog the process on the U.S. side of the border, too. We've learned from the Keystone XL fight that mobilizing grassroots opposition from the start is key.

Friends of the Earth is joining with the Natural Resources Defense Council, Sierra Club, and other environmental and public interest groups in New England and Canada to deliver more than 25,000 comments to the Canadian National Energy Board before the deadline this Monday.

By showing that people in both Canada and the U.S. are taking a stand against tar sands oil, you can help us turn up the heat on the National Energy Board to conduct a full accounting of the pipeline's risks to people's health and the environment -- and continue to build the cross-border coalition we need to stop the tar sands industry once and for all.

It’s time to hold these dirty energy companies accountable for wreaking havoc on our climate and our environment and putting our health at risk. Sign the petition to the Canadian National Energy Board today.

For clean water and healthy communities,
Kim Huynh
Tar sands campaigner, Friends of the Earth

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